Seasons of Change

Last year I got to see my very first New England fall. It was even more spectacular than I had imagined. I have never seen such an array of yellows, oranges, reds and golds; it was as if the trees were bursting into fire. When I was moving around, for a long time I didn’t have a “real” fall, as the climates I was living in didn’t always have 4 defined seasons. Then we moved to France, and I could finally enjoy all 4 seasons again, as I can here in Connecticut too. I love every season; each one is beautiful and fantastic in its own unique way. But I had never yet experienced an autumn quite like the one I got to see here. I’m looking forward to seeing the trees change color soon; I don’t think I could ever tire of nature’s beautiful art.

Nevertheless, as much as I love the fall, I don’t necessarily love everything here, just as I didn’t love absolutely everything in every other place I’ve lived in. But the fundamental thing I’ve learned is how important it is to focus on all the good things and truly take advantage of enjoying them. As TCKs, I think we have a more acute awareness than others that no single place is entirely perfect or entirely awful. While it’s important to be conscious of the more negative issues, it’s crucial to focus mainly on the positive and to make the most of those. We could live somewhere for 1 year, 5 years, 10 years; it doesn’t matter how long you live somewhere as long as you truly cherish that experience and take everything you can out of it. There will always be drawbacks and complications in every place, but there will also be magnificent opportunities, beautiful places, fascinating people who make your time there worthwhile.

It’s often easier in hindsight to see the things we missed out on and possibly regret that later; try to see the good in the present and you won’t have regrets. Well, maybe you’ll regret not having more time there! It may sound cliched, but the only way to really make the most out of any situation, any location, is to seize every opportunity it gives you, no matter how big or small. The humid, tropical climate of the Philippines was not a particular favorite of mine, but the vivid colors of the exotic flowers all over the garden will always stay with me. As will the taste of the juiciest, most delicious mangoes I’ve ever eaten in my life! Those may seem like minor details, and insignificant in the big picture, but I tend to think it’s the small things that really matter. We should never overlook the power of the smaller details in life; they’re the ones that complete the big picture.

Every place, like every season, has something to love, something to look forward to, something to enjoy, no matter how big or how small. Those are the things we have to hold on to when the going gets tough. Being a TCK isn’t always easy; changes are imminent, they’re just part of our lives. It’s how you deal with those changes that make all the difference. You can think that the trees will no longer be green, that the days will get shorter and the temperature colder; or you can think that the trees will paint the skyline with flames, that you’ll have more time to look at the starry night sky and that you can snuggle under a blanket with a cup of hot chocolate.

Life is only what you make of it, whether you’re a TCK or not. Enjoy every moment, and cherish all the beauty there is in this world. We’re lucky that we get to see so much of it. Don’t waste your time thinking of what isn’t there, or what could have been or where else you could be. Learn to appreciate what each place can offer; it will make your journey an exciting and fulfilling adventure.

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2 thoughts on “Seasons of Change

  1. Thanks for writing this. I discovered it today. I’m a TCK too and change was part of my life. The seasons we had in Africa were a rainy season and a dry season, there weren’t any other variations. Now I Europe I like the 4 seasons. I love spring when everything wakes up again, but I still have to get used to the behaviour that is meant to fit the seasons. So the spring cleaning in the spring, it’s something I was not brought up with, it’s not natural to me. Does this sound strange?

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    1. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment – it’s always wonderful to hear from another TCK!

      As for your question: no, I don’t think it’s strange at all. Being in the States has presented a lot of challenges for me and there are a lot of things that are common here that don’t feel natural at all to me, because I wasn’t brought up with them, so I definitely understand how you feel. We grow up in so many different cultures and behaviours which all become part of us and suddenly when we’re somewhere new and foreign it takes time to adapt. And sometimes we might not even adapt fully. I think that’s part of being a TCK. When you’re brought up in different places and are such a mix of cultures and habits, sometimes it’s difficult to fully fit in in one place, or it takes time. At least those are my thoughts and experiences. Please feel free to share your thoughts and experiences – I would love to hear them!

      Thanks again for commenting, and I do hope I’ll hear from you again!

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